Modelling Science

About the Session 

From an enormous protein structure to plaster casts of chicken heads, students will see models spanning different scientific fields, dating from the 18th century to the 20th. They will learn about the importance of models in scientific investigations and discoveries throughout Biology, Chemistry and Physics. They will analyse the representation of concepts including electricity and genetic inheritance, have an in-depth look at the history of molecular models, and operate a mechanical model of the solar system.

Science, Exploration and Empire

Via gallery investigation, source analysis and discussion, students will get a glimpse of science from the diverse perspectives of colonial forces and native peoples. After being led around our collections by a museum teacher, students will be given sources and objects in order to prepare presentations on how colonialism and Empire affected science and vice versa.

Duration: Can be booked as: 

A 60-minute outreach session (online or in person) with ideas for activities to complete in class

or

A 90-minute session in the museum. 

The Art and Science of Light

About the Session 

This set of activities uses objects from the Whipple Museum to explore:

Links between art and science

Microscopes

Telescopes 

Reflection and refraction

Optical illusions and how they work 

Duration: Can be booked as: 

A 60-minute outreach session (online or in person) with ideas for experiments to complete in class

or

Bubble escape and drag race for schools

here are many different types of volcanoes. Shield volcanoes have a broad rounded shape and gentle splattery eruptions often described as fire fountains. Strato volcanoes are sharp and steep sided and have violent explosive eruptions. But what makes these two types of volcano look and erupt so differently? It is mainly controlled by how think (viscous) or runny the magma in the volcano is...

In this experiment you can use 3 different thickness (viscosity) liquids to see what differences runny or thick magma can cause in volcanoes.

Vinegar Volcano for schools

Volcanoes form when hot molten rock (magma) under the ground erupts at the surface, but what causes the molten rock to erupt? Eruptions are often driven by gases escaping…

In this experiment you can start a chemical reaction that creates a gas, and see how the gas escaping drives an eruption.

This experiment and video was devised by the Volcano Seismology group in the Earth Science Department, University of Cambridge.

Download the instructions and information sheet.

Sedgwick Museum: School visits

We offer facilitated workshops and self-led visits. There is no charge for our school sessions, but we welcome donations to support the Museum learning programme (recommended donation of £2 per child). Get in touch with the Museum Education Coordinator to discus your visit museumeducation@esc.cam.ac.uk