Make your own rat-shaped shadow puppet then use it to try some shadow experiments.

Download activity here.

Find out how the multi-coloured northern lights are created then have a go at creating your own.

Download activity here.

If we look closely, rocks tell us the story of their formation. So, grab your notebook and set out on a mini field trip to find out more about how the formation of a rock reflects its physical properties, and what properties architects look for in a building stone.

We offer facilitated workshops and self-led visits. There is no charge for our school sessions, but we welcome donations to support the Museum learning programme (recommended donation of £2 per child). Get in touch with the Museum Education Coordinator to discus your visit museumeducation@esc.cam.ac.uk

Museum Trails

If you are visiting the Museum with young children, why not download our Rainbow of Colour trail to print out and bring with you? It will keep the children entertained as they look for all the colourful specimens in the Museum, and they can even use it in the garden or any outdoor space too.

 

All bookings are subject to change in accordance with government guidance.

There is no charge for our standard school sessions, but donations are welcomed to support the Museum learning programme (recommended donation of £3 per child).

If you are a UK based school wishing to visit the Museum with your class, please use the booking form to make a request. Please note that the Museum is closed on Mondays. We advise submitting a request at least 2 weeks in advance to avoid disappointment and allow time to receive a confirmation.

To make your zine you will need:

  • a sheet of paper
  • coloured pencils or pens
  • coloured paper
  • some glue
  • fossils, rocks, pebbles for inspiration
Download the zine folding instructions and watch the video below

 

Asteriornis maastrichtensis, affectionately known as the Wonderchicken, is among the most exciting bird fossils ever found. It has one of the best-preserved fossil bird skulls in the world, and gives us important insights into the evolutionary origins of modern birds.

It might not look very exciting but flint gravel has a story to tell of a warm chalky sea that covered a lot of England about 90 million years ago. That’s when dinosaur were around although they were not living in this particular sea. Sometimes flint filles the holes made by borrowing animals and sometimes, if we’re lucky it enclosed the remains of sea creatures meaning it is great place to look for fossils.

Scientists use all sorts of different ways to name the new plants, animals and fossils they find.

Two parts - Scientific names usually have two parts, just as people have a first name and a family name.

Latin or Ancient Greek - Often the names use words from Latin or Ancient Greek.

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