Fluffy Bee

Did you know the first bees would have been flying around in the Cretaceous just as ‘Iggy’ our Iguanodon was snacking on leaves from tall trees? At the Sedgwick Museum we have two 20million year old honey bees trapped in amber. Found on Yarmouth beach in 1891.

Amy Smith studies bees Plant Sciences in Cambridge. In this activity Amy shows us how to make a bee-autiful fluffy bumble bee. You will need some card and wool. 

Vinegar Volcano

Volcanoes form when hot molten rock (magma) under the ground erupts at the surface, but what causes the molten rock to erupt? Eruptions are often driven by gases escaping…

In this experiment you can start a chemical reaction that creates a gas, and see how the gas escaping drives an eruption.

This experiment and video was devised by the Volcano Seismology group in the Earth Science Department, University of Cambridge.

Bubble escape and drag race

There are many different types of volcanoes. Shield volcanoes have a broad rounded shape and gentle splattery eruptions often described as fire fountains. Strato volcanoes are sharp and steep sided and have violent explosive eruptions. But what makes these two types of volcano look and erupt so differently? It is mainly controlled by how think (viscous) or runny the magma in the volcano is...

In this experiment you can use 3 different thickness (viscosity) liquids to see what differences runny or thick magma can cause in volcanoes.

Bag of bones

It is really unusual for a palaeontologist (scientist who study fossils) to find a complete skeleton with all the bones in the right place. We are more likely to find only a few bones or a jumbled up skeleton.

Putting a skeleton back to together when you know what the animal looks like can be a challenge, but imagine how hard that becomes when there are no more of those creatures alive for you look at. It is a bit like trying to put a jigsaw puzzle together when you don’t have the photo on the box as a guide.

Gravel Hunters

It might not look very exciting but flint gravel has a story to tell of a warm chalky sea that covered a lot of England about 90 million years ago. That’s when dinosaur were around although they were not living in this particular sea. Sometimes it filled the holes made by borrowing animals and sometimes, if we’re lucky it enclosed the remains of sea creatures meaning it is great place to look for fossils.

Look Think Do

Our big range of Look, Think, Do activities encourage children and families to look deeply and thoughtfully at objects and to respond imaginatively through thinking, talking and making together -from Ancient Egyptian neckpieces to coins stamped by protesting Suffragettes.

You can use the shorter Look and Think activities for just a few minutes or spend a bit longer making something fantastic.